"Aces of The Eighth" by Jack Fellows

A/1C Joseph D. Clark

Dear Tex, Nogas, & Lude, My father, Joseph D. Clark, served with the Headhunters in Korea as an F80 ordnance loader – I believe he was with the 36th squadron (three red stripes on the tail). He worked on F80s early in the conflict, graduating to the big stuff (loading nukes onto B47s) when he returned stateside. Going through old…

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Jerry Minton’s 80FBS Presentation

A few years ago, LTM Jerry Minton gave a PowerPoint presentation to the US Air Force Academy that highlighted the role played by the 80 FBS in Korea. Associate LTM (and 80 FS Association Korean War Historian) Gerry Asher was kind enough to transcribe the entire presentation to a CD. Too bad there is no audio, but none  was  recorded…

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Headhunter Korean War Losses

It’s also fitting on this Memorial Day 2015 to post a list of casualty, kills and aircraft losses that we suffered in Korea. I’d like to personally thank our Korean War Historian, LTM Gerry Asher for these lists and for his continuing support of the 80th and our Association.  Even though he never served in the Headhunters, we should feel…

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Headhunter Korean War KIA

On this Memorial Day 2015 it is fitting to honor and remember our comrades lost in yet another war the politicians would not let us win.  Even so, they did not give their lives in vain. AMERICAN FIGHTER PILOT excerpt. (Author unknown; a Juvat Headhunter ca mid-1980’s is all we know) Many of our friends, Some of the best, For…

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Lt Robertson’s 80th Yearbook

Lt Robertson 80th Yearbook This  bit of Headhunter history comes from new LTM JR Robertson, son of LTMs John (D) and Lorraine Robertson and is a copy of his dad’s yearbook from the Japan-Korea 1950-1951 era. Permanent link is in History>Korea>Korea Memoirs Priceless. Enjoy.

Korea Memoir by Gene Gould

“Here is a little known story for you.  It is one that I don’t know what the end of the story was and always wondered.  I had replaced the [Public Information Officer] PIO officer, the I & E and the Special Services Officer.  That was two first lieutenants and a captain.  I was sitting in my office down by the…

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Korea Memoir by Harold Fischer

“The stop at Hawaii was a welcome change and it seemed as if there could be no better place to have something go wrong with one of the engines. We were delayed by an engine change and it gave us an opportunity to look the island over. Going from the airport, one could see The University of Hawaii on the…

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Korea Memoir by Ernie Fahlberg

“I believe the Shooting Star was the best ground support plane made at that time. It could be shot all to pieces and still fly. I’ve seen as much as four feet shot off the wing of one and the pilot would still get her home. It could sneak up on the enemy and clobber them before they could even…

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Korea Memoir by Jerry Minton

“The first F-80 Shooting Star I ever saw was at an air show at Carswell Air Force Base in the late forties. It was flown slick-without tip tanks or bomb pylons (after all it was a high altitude interceptor design) and was painted with white enamel. The pilot would make low passes-pull up into loops or Immelmann turns-or seemingly climb…

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Korea Memoir by Evan Rosencrans

“I was in Korea from July 1950 to April 1951. On several occasions I had the opportunity to exchange firepower with the Mig-15s. At that time the Mig pilots were terrible gunners despite the sizable advantages of the Mig over our Shooting Stars. About the seventh of December, 1950, I was leading a flight of four F-80s flying top cover…

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Korea Memoir by Dean Price

“When I was in Korea, it was strictly bare bones. We lived in Quonset huts that had never been painted and had no insulation or covering of any kind on the inside walls, all you saw or felt was the cold, corrugated steel. There was one flight to a hut. The hut was heated with fuel oil furnaces made of…

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Korea Memoir by Louis Miksits

“In 1948 (July) when I was first ordered to the 80th Fighter squadron at Ashiya Air Base, Kyushu, I thought at the time that we were neither liked or disliked. What I mean by that is the Japanese were just coming off the war and were more interested in making the best of it. They were short of everything; food,…

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